News and Alerts

Estate Planning Newsletter — July 20, 2021

In this issue of our Estate Planning Newsletter Can You Use Charitable Trusts? You can reduce the tax burden your heirs incur on their inheritance — while you support meaningful charities. Click through to learn how to use charitable trusts for income tax deductions...

Estate Planning Newsletter — June 22, 2021

In this issue of our Estate Planning Newsletter Can GRITs, GRATs and GRUTs Help You? Grantor retained income trusts, grantor retained annuity trusts and grantor retained unitrusts reduce the amount of your estate that's subject to gift tax, among many other benefits....

Estate Planning Newsletter — May 25, 2021

In this issue of our Estate Planning Newsletter The Pandemic Prods Us To Get Our Affairs in Order The pandemic was a frightening wake-up call, reminding us of how fast things can change. Click through to learn how to take action now and make sure you're prepared for...

Estate Planning Newsletter — April 27, 2021

Estate Planning Newsletter — April 27, 2021

In this issue of our Estate Planning Newsletter Tax Treatment for Family Members Working in the Family Business When you include family members in your business operations, there are tax treatments and employment tax rules that need to be applied. Click through to...

Estate Planning Newsletter — March 2, 2021

Estate Planning Newsletter — March 2, 2021

In this issue, read about The Secret Power of Trusts, What To Know About the Alternative Minimum Tax, Your Grandchildren and Your Estate, How To Raise and Maintain a Credit Score, and more!

Court Says Employee Cannot Claim Discrimination Not Asserted Before Administrative Agency, But Also Says The Employee Does Not Forego Claims In Court By Seeking Arbitration

Court Says Employee Cannot Claim Discrimination Not Asserted Before Administrative Agency, But Also Says The Employee Does Not Forego Claims In Court By Seeking Arbitration

In Nuey v. City of Cranston, the United States District Court for the District of Rhode Island recently ruled that an employee cannot bring a claim for a particular type of discrimination in court when the employee did not specifically identify that type of discrimination in an administrative complaint before the state agency charged with investigating discrimination.

Rhode Island salon employee’s lawsuit gets a trim

The decision provides a reminder that employees must tie their FLSA claims to unpaid minimum wages or overtime, and that private individuals (as opposed to the government) lack standing to sue for alleged violations of the state’s Sunday and holiday pay statute.

State of the law: noncompete agreements in Rhode Island

On July 15, 2019, Governor Gina Raimondo signed the Rhode Island Noncompetition Agreement Act into law. Beginning on January 15, 2020, the statute will place new limits on the enforceability of noncompete agreements in the Ocean State.