News and Alerts

Three Whelan Corrente Attorneys Named “Lawyer of the Year” by Best Lawyers of 2022

Three Whelan Corrente Attorneys Named “Lawyer of the Year” by Best Lawyers of 2022

Only a single lawyer in each practice area and community is honored with a “Lawyer of the Year” award. We congratulate Robert Clark Corrente (Litigation – Environmental in Providence), Joseph R. Marion, III (Trusts and Estates in Providence), and Joseph D. Whelan (Labor Law – Management in Providence). All three, along with Robert G. Flanders, Jr., are also recognized for their excellence in a number of practice areas.

Estate Planning Newsletter — March 2, 2021

Estate Planning Newsletter — March 2, 2021

In this issue, read about The Secret Power of Trusts, What To Know About the Alternative Minimum Tax, Your Grandchildren and Your Estate, How To Raise and Maintain a Credit Score, and more!

Court Says Employee Cannot Claim Discrimination Not Asserted Before Administrative Agency, But Also Says The Employee Does Not Forego Claims In Court By Seeking Arbitration

Court Says Employee Cannot Claim Discrimination Not Asserted Before Administrative Agency, But Also Says The Employee Does Not Forego Claims In Court By Seeking Arbitration

In Nuey v. City of Cranston, the United States District Court for the District of Rhode Island recently ruled that an employee cannot bring a claim for a particular type of discrimination in court when the employee did not specifically identify that type of discrimination in an administrative complaint before the state agency charged with investigating discrimination.

Rhode Island salon employee’s lawsuit gets a trim

The decision provides a reminder that employees must tie their FLSA claims to unpaid minimum wages or overtime, and that private individuals (as opposed to the government) lack standing to sue for alleged violations of the state’s Sunday and holiday pay statute.

State of the law: noncompete agreements in Rhode Island

On July 15, 2019, Governor Gina Raimondo signed the Rhode Island Noncompetition Agreement Act into law. Beginning on January 15, 2020, the statute will place new limits on the enforceability of noncompete agreements in the Ocean State.

Employer Liability: Timing Is Everything: Gender Bias Claims Iced By Employer’s Records

Employer Liability: Timing Is Everything: Gender Bias Claims Iced By Employer’s Records

In Bonilla-Ramirez v. MVM, Inc., the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 1st Circuit recently ruled that an employer didn’t discriminate against an employee based on gender or illegally retaliate against her when it terminated her for violating its standards of conduct. The 1st Circuit focused on whether the employer had a legitimate reason for terminating the employee and on the timing of the employee’s complaints.

Litigation: Differing decisions illustrate disability discrimination pleading requirements

In June 2018, Chief Judge William E. Smith of the U.S. District Court for the District of Rhode Island dismissed an employee’s disability discrimination complaint for failing to adequately allege that she had a disability. Less than two months later, Judge John J. McConnell (of the same court) denied an employer’s motion to dismiss that made the same argument.